Tag Archives: Hash

Course track

SUMMER IN GRENADA, SEASON 2 – by Theresa

Leaving the Tobago Cays astern, cruising just outside of the exclusionary zone for the underwater volcano, Kick ’em Jenny, we spotted Grenada, our summer home port for our second hurricane season, immediately on the horizon.  We cruised down the leeward side of the island, past the small fishing village of Gouyave, and into our summer home port in St. Georges harbor.

 

Pilots' Discretion cruising in to St. Georges, Grenada

Pilots’ Discretion cruising into St. Georges harbor, Grenada

After clearing immigration and customs, we hoisted  the courtesy flag of our host nation.

While we endured typical Grenada passing showers on the day we arrived, we had many sunny days ahead of us. With school out for the summer, the boys immediately set out looking for some summer fun and adventures. Since this is our second summer in Grenada (see A Day in the Life of Grenada, 2015/08/02), we were already familiar with the lay of the land. We did not miss a beat getting back into the swing of the weekly, often wet and muddy, but always scenic and fun hikes (a.k.a. “hashes”).

Ronan rope action, hiking in Grenada

Ronan rope action, hiking in Grenada

Ryan crossing the stream hiking in Grenada (no use even trying to keep those shoes dry!)

Ryan crossing the stream hiking in Grenada (no use even trying to keep those shoes dry!)

Ronan and Ryan hiking in Grenada ... just a little muddy

Ronan and Ryan hiking in Grenada … just a little muddy. The shredded paper marks the trail.

Ronan taking in the view on the hash in Grenada

Ronan taking in the view on the hash in Grenada

There are a lot of other ‘kid boats’ riding out the hurricane season in Grenada, so much so, the boat kids have their own morning net on the VHF radio to communicate and organize events. The ‘Kids Organized Society’ (KOS, pronounced K-os, or chaos) meets weekly at Secret Harbor for a variety of fun activities.

In the spirit of the 2016 Olympic games, the kids came together on Calabash Beach, Prickly Bay, for a mini-Olympics. There were relay races, three-legged races, swimming competitions and the ever popular tug-of war!

Calabash Beach Mini-Olympics

Ready, set, go!

Ronan and Ryan on the GYC dock

Ronan and Ryan on the GYC dock

The boys spent most of the summer at the Grenada Yacht Club sailing camp. Since this was their second summer attending the camp, they were afforded greater responsibility for rigging and de-rigging the boats. They also helped teach the new, younger sailors the points of sail and how to read the wind and water. (See last years’ post on Camp Grenada, 2015/08/07)

Grenada Yacht Club, St. Georges, Grenada

Grenada Yacht Club, St. Georges, Grenada

Sailing in St. Georges, Grenada

Sailing in St. Georges, Grenada

Ronan sailing

Ronan sailing

Ryan derigging the mosquito

Ryan derigging the mosquito

Working together to put the sails away

Working together to put the sails away

Another fun adventure we enjoyed this summer was a river tubing birthday party!

The summer has not been all fun and games. We have accomplished a great many ‘boat projects’ this summer, with more on the horizon. Next week we are having the boat hauled out of the water so that we can have her bottom painted along with some additional projects that are best achieved with the boat on the hard. We will ride out the boat haul at one of our favorite places in Grenada, Mount Cinnamon Resort. More to follow on that in our next post …

Cliff Diver, Concord Waterfalls

Family Visitors in Grenada (a.k.a. “The Spice Isle”) Part I – by Theresa

Patti & Chuck at PLM beach, Carenage in the background

Patti & Chuck at PLM beach, Carenage in the background

My sister-in-law “Patti” recently asked me “When are you coming home?” I replied, “We are home. Home is where the boat is!” Upon hearing this, she decided that if she and her husband “Chuck” were going to visit us in the near future, then it was going to have to be on the boat. Since we are currently stationed in Grenada, she promptly made arrangements and within weeks we had the pleasure of hosting both Patti and Chuck on board the Pilot’s Discretion.

HASH HIKE

We wasted no time introducing them to our Grenadian adventures and on the first full day of their visit they accompanied us on our weekly hike. This week’s hike began on the north shore beach in Sauteaurs, continued up mountainsides, and did not disappoint in providing the usual vigorous exercise and spectacular views (click on any photo to enlarge or for slideshow).

GRAND ANSE BEACH

Having exerted ourselves on the hike, we opted to spend the next day relaxing on the beach.  First, some 50’s music, and dancing, at Coconuts, on Grand Anse Beach, and then dinner at The Aquarium Restaurant, Point Salines, at sunset.

CLIFF DIVING AT CONCORD WATERFALLS

With so much more to see and explore in Grenada, and only a short time to share with our guests, we chartered an air conditioned bus, with an experienced guide, Mr. Rawl Bell (“Rawl”). Rawl provided us with a wealth of  information regarding the beauties of Grenada, a.k.a. “The Spice Isle.” Our first stop was Concord Waterfalls, one of the countless natural waterfalls on the island.

The kids enjoyed playing on the rocks and we all enjoyed the natural beauty of the falls .

Shortly after our arrival at the falls, a local “cliff diver” climbed to the top of the falls and amazed us all with his daring cliff diving acumen.  It did not take long for my ever-adventuresome brother-in-law Chuck to dive in after him (click on any photo to enlarge or for slideshow).

(Note: We have created a dedicated YouTube channel at http://www.youtube.com where we have compiled videos from our blog, and uploaded additional videos from our journey. To view the videos, including VIDEOS of Chuck, and the cliff diver, cliff diving, click https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC94z5hCIrRiEvY8MTJegTbA  (or copy and paste into browser).

NUTMEG FACTORY

Nutmeg Receiving Station (Examined, Weighed, Payment to Farmer

Nutmeg Receiving Station (Examined, Weighed, Payment to Farmer)

After the cliff diving adventures at the waterfalls, our guide informed us that Grenada is the world’s second largest producer of nutmeg, after Indonesia, and that nutmeg is Grenada’s principal export crop. He then took us to the nutmeg-processing co-op, in the center of the west-coast fishing village of Gouyave (pronounced gwahv), where we got to witness first hand the nutmeg process from tree to spice. There we saw locally grown nutmeg being received, examined & weighed with payments made to the local farmers. We learned the nutmeg is then dried in drying racks for 6-8 weeks.

 

Once dried, the seeds are cracked by a machine and then sent down a chute to the floor below where workers manually separate the shells from the nuts. No resource is wasted and discarded shells are collected in burlap sacks and sold for mulch. The nutmeg fragrance at the factory is intoxicating.

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Next, nutmeg kernels are graded by floating them in water (sinkers are sound and floaters are defective). Workers then hand grade the remaining nutmeg, removing residual defects and running the remaining nutmeg through metal graders (for size). The final nutmeg product is bagged in hand painted stenciled burlap sacks with international destinations throughout the world. We were surprised to learn that Rotterdam and Antwerp are the two largest importers of Grenadian nutmeg. The factory produces approximately 3 million pounds of Grenada’s most famous export each year.

A lot of effort for a small, yet delicious, spice present in almost all spice racks!

LEATHERBACK TURTLES IN LEVERA BAY

After the nutmeg factory, we visited yet another notorious spot on Grenada, Levera Bay. Levera Bay is a Sanctuary to the endangered Leatherback Sea Turtle. Each year, Leatherback Sea Turtles return to Grenada to lay their eggs on the sandy beaches of Levera Bay.

Leatherback Sea Turtles can grow to more than six feet long, weighing as much as 1400 pounds, however, the initial hatchlings, only inches long, are left on their own to find their way from the beach to the sea. Due to a recent invasion of Sargasso Sea weed on Grenada’s coastline, the baby Leatherback Sea Turtles have been finding it difficult to reach the sea. On the day that we arrived in Levera Bay, the Park Rangers were assisting this group of baby Leatherback Sea Turtles in reaching the sea!

(To view a video of the baby Leatherback Back Sea Turtles click the “VIDEOS” tab at the top of this page.)

After all the excitement exploring Grenada, we stopped to rest, enjoying some local cuisine on the north shore of Grenada looking out over “Kick em Jenny,”  and Ronde and Caille Islands.

Chuck, Patti, Ronan and Ryan, lunch on the north shore

Chuck, Patti, Ronan and Ryan, lunch on the north shore

There was still much more of Grenada to explore … however, we will leave those adventures until another post!