Author Archives: Theresa

Approaching Providenciales Turks & Caicos

TURKS & CAICOS (May 2018) – By Theresa

Sunrise departure, Ocean World Marina, Puerto Plata, Dominican RepublicSunrise departure, Ocean World Marina, Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic

BIG SAND CAY (May 2018)

Leaving the Dominican Republic (DR) astern, after a glorious sunrise departure, our first stop in Turks & Caicos was at Big Sand Cay, a small uninhabited Cay approximately 80 nautical miles northwest of the Dominican Republic. As we approached Big Sand Cay, we only saw a few other boats at anchor, so we had visions of a restful evening, virtually alone, on this idyllic cay, beautifully set off by itself in the Atlantic Ocean.

We tucked into the bay with only a small handful of other boats, just as the wind started to really pick up. With the winds howling around 20 knots, we watched a fellow cruiser scale his mast because he was unable to furl his Genoa and drop anchor.

Big Sand Cay, Turks & Caicos

Big Sand Cay, Turks & Caicos

Shortly after the sailor secured his catamaran, we sat back and enjoyed the quiet solitude of the anchorage.

Big Sand Cay, Turks & Caicos

Big Sand Cay, Turks & Caicos

Later, the fun really kicked in. I guess we read the wrong travel brochure because after we set our anchor, an entire flotilla of sailboats, of all shapes and sizes, descended upon our tranquil overnight stop. Big Sand Cay was now the overnight destination of choice for over 25 cruising boats. Just to ensure that everyone was properly entertained, Mother Nature put on a thunderstorm and lightning show complete with winds gusting to 42 knots. We had put out 10 to 1 scope on our ground tackle in anticipation of just such an event, so we were secure and staying firmly in place. The same could not be said for many of our neighboring boats, and, as a result, the radios were alive with stressful conversations as boats dragged their anchors all around us. Thankfully, the storms died down shortly after 1 a.m., so we did still manage to get some rest before our sunrise departure west to Providenciales, Turks and Caicos.

Sunrise departure, Big Sand Cay, Turks & Caicos

Sunrise departure, Big Sand Cay, Turks & Caicos

PROVIDENCIALES, TURKS & CAICOS (May 2018)

As we approached  Providenciales, Turks & Caicos, the skies once again darkened and the winds picked up considerably. The channel to our next port of call, South Side Marina, is narrow, with shallow depths and little room for maneuverability on a good day. We rode out the storm just outside of the channel, allowing it to simmer down before entering.

Approaching Providenciales Turks & Caicos

Approaching Providenciales Turks & Caicos

Approaching Providenciales Turks & Caicos

Approaching Providenciales Turks & Caicos

When we finally entered the channel, we had to navigate around a sailboat, run hard aground, nearly in the middle of the channel.

This sailboat ran aground in the channel approach to Southside Marina, Providenciales Turks & Caicos

This sailboat ran aground in the channel approach to South Side Marina, Providenciales Turks & Caicos

With precision maneuvers, we passed her starboard side and cleared in to Bob Pratt’s  South Side Marina. (Note: the sailboat sat in the channel until high tide came in and then floated herself free.)

We stopped at South Side Marina on our journey south in 2015 [See Turks & Caicos (2015)].  The boys had, obviously, grown quite a bit since then!

Bob’s place, upstairs, was as beautiful as we had remembered, complete with bocce ball, and Bob’s sweet new dog “Maddie.”

Bob's place at Southside Marina, Providenciales Turks & Caicos

Bob Pratt’s place at South Side Marina, Providenciales Turks & Caicos

R&R bocce ball at Southside Marina, Providenciales Turks & Caicos

R&R bocce ball at South Side Marina, Providenciales Turks & Caicos

Southside Marina, Providenciales Turks & Caicos

South Side Marina Harbor Master’s dog Maddie resting at South Side Marina, Providenciales Turks & Caicos

The views, at and around, the marina are nothing short of breath-taking.

Providenciales, Turks & Caicos

Providenciales, Turks & Caicos

Providenciales, Turks & Caicos

Providenciales, Turks & Caicos

The marina is only a few miles away from the airport, which makes it a good place to pick up or drop off guests. Marina owner, Bob Pratt, provides courtesy transportation to nearby grocery store(s) for provisioning and makes everyone feel at home.

When it came time to continue our northbound journey, we fueled up and headed back out the channel.

Ronan assisting with the fueling at Southside Marina, Providenciales Turks & Caicos

Ronan assisting with the fueling at South Side Marina, Providenciales Turks & Caicos

Randy fueling up at Southside Marina, Providenciales Turks & Caicos

Randy fueling up at South Side Marina, Providenciales Turks & Caicos

Southside Marina, looking towards the channel, Providenciales Turks & Caicos

South Side Marina, looking towards the channel, Providenciales Turks & Caicos

We set our course northwest towards our next stop, the remote Mayaguana and  Acklins Islands in the southern Bahamas . . .

Cap Cana Marina & Beach Resort, Dominican Republic

DOMINICAN REPUBLIC (April 2018)- By Theresa

We had a smooth 80+ mile passage across the Mona Passage, a notoriously rough open water passage which connects the Atlantic Ocean and the Caribbean Sea. Immediately upon arrival in the Dominican Republic (DR), we were boarded by Immigration, Customs, Navy, and Department of Agriculture, all of whom had their requisite paperwork and fee(s).

Boats travelling in the Dominican Republic must obtain a “Despacho” (written permission to travel between ports) from the DR Navy prior to every departure. Cruising up the west coast of the Dominican Republic, and eastward across its north coast, we pulled into three ports: Marina Cap Cana , in Punta Cana; Puerto Bahia Marina, in Samana; and Ocean World Marina, in Puerto Plata. We had visited, and wrote about, each of these ports on our journey south [See Puerto Plato, Domincan Republic (2015) and Samana & Punta Cana, Dominican Republic (2015)], so this post will be brief, and utilized only to share some updated photos and anecdotes from our most recent visit.

MARINA CAP CANA, PUNTA CANA (April 2018)

Cap Cana Marina & Resort, Dominican Republic

Cap Cana Marina & Resort, Dominican Republic

Waterside dining & infinity pool, Cap Cana Marina, Dominican Republic

Waterside dining & infinity pool, Cap Cana Marina, Dominican Republic

Cap Cana Marina & Beach Resort, Dominican Republic

Cap Cana Marina & Beach Resort, Dominican Republic

The boys had more than enough outdoor activities to keep them busy.

Beachside tennis courts, Cap Cana Marina, Dominican Republic

Beachside tennis courts, Cap Cana Marina, Dominican Republic

Cap Cana Marina & Resort, Dominican Republic

Cap Cana Marina & Resort, Dominican Republic

Cap Cana Marina & Beach Resort, Dominican Republic

Cap Cana Marina & Beach Resort, Dominican Republic

Cap Cana Marina & Beach Resort, Dominican Republic

Cap Cana Marina & Beach Resort, Dominican Republic

Cap Cana Marina & Beach Resort, Dominican Republic

Cap Cana Marina & Beach Resort, Dominican Republic

Cap Cana Marina & Beach Resort, Dominican Republic

Cap Cana Marina & Beach Resort, Dominican Republic

Cap Cana Marina & Beach Resort, Dominican Republic

Cap Cana Marina & Beach Resort, Dominican Republic

PUERTO BAHIA MARINA, SAMANA (April 2018)

Puerto Bahia Marina is an idyllic full service resort marina tucked away in the north end of Samana Bay. While we were there, we encountered a lovely young couple, Doug and Roxanna, vacationing from Georgia, U.S.A., who recognized us solely from having read our blog. Avid boaters themselves, with cruising dreams of their own, Doug & Roxanna reviewed our blog searching for information on cruising the Caribbean. It was nice to hear that our blog has provided relevant information and inspired others to follow their cruising dreams. Fair winds Doug and Roxanna!

Puerto Bahia Marina, Samana, Dominican Republic

Puerto Bahia Marina, Samana, Dominican Republic

There was no shortage of activities in Puerto Bahia.

Billiard room, Puerto Bahia Marina, Samana, Dominican Republic

Billiard room, Puerto Bahia Marina, Samana, Dominican Republic

Billiard room, Puerto Bahia Marina, Samana, Dominican Republic

Billiard room, Puerto Bahia Marina, Samana, Dominican Republic

Infinity Pool, Puerto Bahia Marina, Samana, Dominican Republic

Infinity Pool, Puerto Bahia Marina, Samana, Dominican Republic

R&R in the game room, Puerto Bahia Marina, Dominican Republic

R&R in the game room, Puerto Bahia Marina, Dominican Republic

Ryan ready for chess, Puerto Bahia Marina, Samana, Dominican Republic

Ryan ready for chess, Puerto Bahia Marina, Samana, Dominican Republic

Ocean Club, Puerto Bahia Marina, Samana, Dominican Republic

Ocean Club, Puerto Bahia Marina, Samana, Dominican Republic

Ocean Club infinity pool, Puerto Bahia Marina, Samana, Dominican Republic

Ocean Club infinity pool, Puerto Bahia Marina, Samana, Dominican Republic

I was once again, astounded to see how much the boys had grown since our last visit to the Dominican Republic on our southbound journey in 2015.

OCEAN WORLD MARINA, PUERTO PLATA (April 2018)

Ocean World Marina, Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic

Ocean World Marina, Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic

Ocean World Marina, Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic

Ocean World Marina, Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic

Ocean World Marina & Casino, Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic

Ocean World Marina & Casino, Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic

Ocean World Marina & Casino, Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic

Ocean World Marina & Casino, Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic

Sunrise departure, Ocean World Marina, Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic

Sunrise departure, Ocean World Marina, Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic

We staged in Ocean World until the next appropriate weather window. Continuing our journey north from the Dominican Republic, we next set our course to Big Sand Cay, Turks and Caicos …

Sunset at The Yacht Club Marina at Palmas Del Mar Marina, Humacao, Puerto Rico

POST HURRICANE PUERTO RICO (March 2018) – By Theresa

Puerto Rico

Puerto Rico

CULEBRA

After witnessing all of the hurricane destruction throughout the Caribbean, and seeing and hearing all of the news reports about post-hurricane Puerto Rico, we reached out to friends and family of ours living in Puerto Rico to see how we could assist when we arrived. We were repeatedly advised that the best way to help was to visit and spend money in the islands. Our first stop in Puerto Rico we anchored in Ensenada Honda, in Culebra. We were pleasantly surprised when we saw how well she stood up to Hurricane Maria.

Upon arrival, we cleared back into the U.S., via phone, using the Small Vessel Reporting System. It is a convenient way to facilitate and expedite the clearing in process by pre-registering boat and crew information with Customs & Border Protection.

Small Vessel Reporting System

Small Vessel Reporting System

Next we lowered the dinghy to go ashore. We found the cruisers’ hot spot, the Dinghy Dock, was temporarily closed for renovations, however, we were assured that it was set to reopen within a month.

Dodgy Dock, Culebra, Puerto Rico

Dinghy Dock, Culebra, Puerto Rico

We drove our dinghy up the canal to see how our friends at Mamacitas Guest House & Restaurant had fared.

Mamacita’s looked as fabulous as ever. The dinghy dock had a steady stream of boats and patrons all day. They had live music, great food, electricity and Wi-Fi.

Mamacita's Waterfront Grill Culebra, Puerto

Mamacita’s Waterfront Grill Culebra, Puerto

Boat pulling up to Mamacita's Culebra, Puerto Rico

Boat pulling up to Mamacita’s Culebra, Puerto Rico

At times, the boats were rafted up three deep.

Boat pulling up to Mamacita's Culebra, Puerto Rico

Boats pulling up to Mamacita’s Culebra, Puerto Rico

We had to be carefull backing up our dinghy when departing as there was an impressive school of Tarpon positioned just off the dinghy dock behind our dinghy.

School of Tarpon behind our dinghy, Culebra Puerto Rico

School of Tarpon behind our dinghy, Culebra Puerto Rico

PALMAS DEL MAR, HUMACAO

When we originally set our course for mainland Puerto Rico, we had considered going to Marina Puerto del Rey, in Fajardo, since it was positioned further away from where Hurricane Maria touched ground and we had heard reports that it had fared well. However, when we reached out to our dear friend Glenda, who manages The Yacht Club at Palmas del Mar, where we had stayed previously [See Palmas del Mar (2015) and Puerto Rico (2015)] , she assured us that the marina was up and running and ready for visitors. We did not hesitate to return, and are happy to report that, despite being a 1/4 mile north from where Hurricane Maria came ashore in Puerto Rico, Palmas del Mar is indeed a welcoming haven for visiting yachts. The docks, seawall and utilities (electric, water & Wi-Fi) were all in good working order.

Ryan washing the salt off the boat, The Yacht Club Marina at Palmas del Mar, Puerto Rico

Ryan washing the salt off the boat, The Yacht Club Marina at Palmas del Mar, Puerto Rico

Ronan & Ryan, Palmas Del Mar, Humacao, Puerto Rico

Ronan & Ryan, Palmas del Mar, Humacao, Puerto Rico (Vieques in the background)

Fuel was available, and the marina also offered convenient in-slip fueling.

In slip fueling, The Yact Club Marina at Palmas del Mar, Humacao, Puerto Rico

Charlie facilitating in-slip fueling, The Yacht Club Marina at Palmas del Mar, Humacao, Puerto Rico

Provisioning was available at the nearby (walking distance)  plaza where all of the shops and restaurants were open, including a small well stocked grocery store.

Palmas Del Mar, Humacao, Puerto Rico

Palmas del Mar, Humacao, Puerto Rico

Palmas Del Mar, Humacao, Puerto Rico

Palmas del Mar, Humacao, Puerto Rico

Palmas Del Mar, Humacao, Puerto Rico

Palmas del Mar, Humacao, Puerto Rico

The multitude of sport fishermen boats in Plaza del Puerto seemed to have fared well.

Palmas Del Mar, Humacao, Puerto Rico

Palmas del Mar, Humacao, Puerto Rico

Plaza del Puert, Palmas Del Mar, Humacao, Puerto Rico

Plaza del Puerto, Palmas del Mar, Humacao, Puerto Rico

We rented a car from “Target,” the on-premises car rental agency, and drove 25 minutes inland to Plaza Centro Mall, in Caguas. The mall, houses many familiar U.S. chains, including Pet Smart, IHOP, Sam’s Club, Costco & Walmart (all open and fully stocked), which facilitated our provisioning for the remainder of our journey north.

Plaza Centro Mall, Caguas, Puerto Rico

Plaza Centro Mall, Caguas, Puerto Rico

Like so many other Caribbean destinations, Palmas del Mar provided spectacular sunsets.

Sunset at The Yacht Club Marina at Palmas Del Mar Marina, Humacao, Puerto Rico

Sunset at The Yacht Club Marina at Palmas del Mar Marina, Humacao, Puerto Rico

PUERTO REAL, CABO ROJO

From Palmas del Mar, we set a course west along the south coast of Puerto Rico. Our next port of call was Marina Pescadaria, in Puerto Real Bay, in Cabo Rojo, located on the soutwest coast of Puerto Rico.

Marina Pescaderia, Cabo Rojo, Puerto Rico

Marina Pescaderia, Cabo Rojo, Puerto Rico

Marina Pescadaria is a full service marina and was fully operational (water, electric, Wi-Fi and fuel). We were welcomed by our old friend, and marina manager, Jose, who has vast knowledge of the marine industry and Puerto Rico. There is a plethora of nearby restaurants and shops for provisioning. Marina Pescadaria is a good location to stage while awaiting an appropriate weather window to cross the Mona Passage.

During our stay in Puerto Rico, we heard many stories of damage and loss from the storm. We witnessed, first hand, the ongoing rebuilding efforts firmly underway. Everyone we encountered was resiliently looking forward. If approaching Puerto Rico by sea, Marina Pescadaria, Palmas del Mar and Culebra are ready to welcome you.

Our next port of call, Dominican Republic …

Cane Garden Bay, BVIs (March 2018)

CANE GARDEN BAY, BRITISH VIRGIN ISLANDS – by Theresa

Last post on the British Virgin Islands, and then on to Puerto Rico. Our last stop in the British Virgin Islands (BVIs) was Cane Garden Bay, a large sheltered bay, on the nortwest end of Tortola. The bay was full of mooring balls, and several beachside restaurants and shops were open for business. The dinghy dock was missing some boards but was still usable.

Dinghy dock, Cane Garden Bay, Tortola, BVIs (March 2018)

Dinghy dock, Cane Garden Bay, Tortola, BVIs (March 2018)

Quintos, which use to be located at the base of the dock (to the right), regrettably did not survive the storm.

Quintos Restaurant, Cane Garden Bay, Tortola, BVIs (March 2018)

Quintos Restaurant, Cane Garden Bay, Tortola, BVIs (March 2018)

Like the other islands we visited in the BVIs, new construction and repairs take place right alongside the damaged structures.

Construction, Cane Garden Bay, Tortola, BVIs (March 2018)

Construction, Cane Garden Bay, Tortola, BVIs (March 2018)

Cane Garden Bay, Tortola, BVIs (March 2018)

Cane Garden Bay, Tortola, BVIs (March 2018)

We were thrilled to see that our favorite spot in Cane Garden Bay, Myett’s, had reopened for business.

Myett’s is open in Cane Garden Bay, BVIs (March 2018)

Myett’s is open in Cane Garden Bay, BVIs (March 2018)

Myett's Restaurant, Cane Garden Bay, Tortola, BVIs (March 2018)

Myett’s Restaurant, Cane Garden Bay, Tortola, BVIs (March 2018)

Randy at Myett's Restaurant, Cane Garden Bay, Tortola, BVIs (March 2018)

Randy at Myett’s Restaurant, Cane Garden Bay, Tortola, BVIs (March 2018)

Ryan at Myett's Restaurant, Cane Garden Bay, Tortola, BVIs (March 2018)

Ryan at Myett’s Restaurant, Cane Garden Bay, Tortola, BVIs (March 2018)

Myett’s is Cane Garden Bay, BVIs (March 2018)

Myett’s in Cane Garden Bay, BVIs (March 2018)

In addition to great food and ambiance, Myett’s is a prime spot for catching spectacular sunsets.

Sunset view from Myett’s is Cane Garden Bay, BVIs (March 2018)

Sunset view from Myett’s (looking out towards Jost Van Dyke) in Cane Garden Bay, BVIs (March 2018)

Ronan, sunset, Cane Garden Bay, Tortola, British Virgin Islands

Ronan walking the beach at sunset, Cane Garden Bay, Tortola, British Virgin Islands

Cane Garden Bay, BVIs (March 2018)

Cane Garden Bay, BVIs (March 2018)

In sum, the BVIs suffered significant damage from Hurricanes Irma and Maria, however, no amount of hurricanes can take away the intrinsic beauty of these islands or the strength and fortitude of the people who live in these islands. The turquoise blue waters, the magnificent sunsets and the friendly hospitality of the people all remain and make cruising these islands well worth the visit!

Foxy’s 50th Anniversary Celebration, Jost Van Dyke, VIs, (March 2018)

JOST VAN DYKE, BRITISH VIRGIN ISLANDS – by Theresa

GREAT HARBOR

Six months after Hurricane Irma, Jost Van Dyke, like much of the BVIs, displays the dichotomy of destruction and regrowth. In the days immediately following Hurricane Irma, the cruisers’ and charter boat hot spot, “Foxy’s,” in Great Harbor, served as a center for refuge and relief disbursements. Six months later, Foxy’s is up and running and celebrated its 50th Anniversary with a grand soirée. Foxy, with his whimsical sense of humor, sang at the 50th Anniversary celebration, what has become known as “Foxy’s Hurricane Irma Song.

Ryan & Ronan at Foxy's, Great Harbor, Jost Van Dyke, BVIs, (March 2018)

Ryan & Ronan at Foxy’s, Great Harbor, Jost Van Dyke, BVIs, (March 2018)

Foxy's ,Great Harbor, Jost Van Dyke, BVIs, (March 2018)

Foxy’s, Great Harbor, Jost Van Dyke, BVIs, (March 2018)

Ryan & Ronan, Jenga at Foxy's, Great Harbor, Jost Van Dyke, BVIs, (March 2018)

Ryan & Ronan, Jenga at Foxy’s, Great Harbor, Jost Van Dyke, BVIs, (March 2018)

Great Harbor, Jost Van Dyke, seemed to have fewer mooring balls than were available in previous visits, however, there was plenty of room to anchor and the harbor was full of boats.

Great Harobor, Jost Van Dyke (March 2018)

Great Harobor, Jost Van Dyke (March 2018)

There is also a brand new dinghy dock directly in front of Foxy’s.

New dinghy dock, Great Harbor, Jost Van Dyke, BVIs (March 2018)

New dinghy dock, Great Harbor, Jost Van Dyke, BVIs (March 2018)

New dinghy dock in front of Foxy's, Great Harbor, Jost Van Dyke, BVIs, (March 2018)

New dinghy dock in front of Foxy’s, Great Harbor, Jost Van Dyke, BVIs, (March 2018)

Customs and Immigration services are available a short walk down the beach, in Great Harbor. It is a good place to clear in, if heading south, or out, if heading north. Along the beach, are the lingering signs of Hurricane Irma’s destruction, and the resiliency of the recovery efforts.

Relief tent in a box, Jost Van Dyke, BVIs (March 2018)

Relief tent in a box, Jost Van Dyke, BVIs (March 2018)

Corsair's is rebuilding

Corsair’s is rebuilding

WHITE HARBOR

With Pilots’ Discretion securely moored in Great Harbor, we rode the dinghy over to White Harbor. In the immediate aftermath of Hurricane Irma, weekly flotillas cruised into White Bay to assist in the rebuilding efforts. Six months later, as we were repeatedly told “the drinks are still cold and the water is still blue.”  The infamous Soggy Dollar and Hendo’s were both open and fully operational.

Scott & Randy walking ashore to the Soggy Dollar, White Bay, Jost Van Dyke, BVIs (March 2018)

Scott & Randy walking ashore to the Soggy Dollar, White Bay, Jost Van Dyke, BVIs (March 2018)

Ronan, Ryan, Randy & Scott heading into Soggy Dollar, White Bay, Jost Van Dyke, BVIs (March 2018)

Ronan, Ryan, Randy & Scott heading into Soggy Dollar, White Bay, Jost Van Dyke, BVIs (March 2018)

Hendo’s, White Bay, Jost Van Dyke, BVIs (March 2018)

New palm trees outside Soggy Dollar, White Bay, Jost Van Dyke, BVIs (March 2018)

New palm trees outside Soggy Dollar, White Bay, Jost Van Dyke, BVIs (March 2018)

Soggy Dollar & Hendo's, White Bay, Jost Van Dyke, BVIs, (March 2018)

Soggy Dollar & Hendo’s, White Bay, Jost Van Dyke, BVIs, (March 2018)

White Harbor, Jost Van Dyke, BVIs, (March 2018)

White Harbor, Jost Van Dyke, BVIs, (March 2018)

Soggy Dollar, White Bay, Jost Van Dyke (March 2018)

Soggy Dollar, White Bay, Jost Van Dyke (March 2018)

LITTLE HARBOR

Little Harbor, Jost Van Dyke, appeared, to us, to be the hardest hurricane hit harbor on Jost Van Dyke. On previous visits to Jost Van Dyke, we always spent a few nights in Little Harbor because it seemed quieter and quainter to us (translation fewer party boats and more family  friendly). Sidney’s Peace and Love, Harris’ Restaurant and Abe’s were all places not to be missed. Now they are all missing.

The old Sidney’s Peace and Love restaurant and souvenir shop (located to the left of the two white doors in the photos below, is completely  gone. In the immediate aftermath of Hurricane Irma, a large ferry boat landed atop the building wiping out the entire structure. We were glad to see that Sidney’s niece “Strawberry” has since reopened the restaurant on the other side of the building.

Sidney’s Peace & Love, little Harbor, Jost Van Dyke, BVIS (March 2018)

Sidney’s Peace & Love is open, little Harbor, Jost Van Dyke, BVIS (March 2018)

Harris’ Restaurant was likewise completely  destroyed, but is reportedly rebuilding soon.

Harris’s restaurant is gone, but is reportedly rebuilding, Little Harbor, Jost Van Dyke, BVIs (March 2018)

Harris’s restaurant is gone, but is reportedly rebuilding, Little Harbor, Jost Van Dyke, BVIs (March 2018)

Leaving Jost Van Dyke astern, we next cruised over to another one of our favorite bays in the BVIs, Cane Garden Bay. . .

Ronan, Randy, Theresa, Ryan & Scott, Cow Wreck Beach, Anagada, BVIs (March 2018)

ANEGADA, BRITISH VIRGIN ISLANDS -by Theresa

We arrived in Anegada, and she steadfastly did not disappoint us! The water was the clear turquois blue seen mostly on postcards.

Cow Wreck Beach, Anagada, BVIs (March 2018)

Cow Wreck Beach, Anagada, BVIs (March 2018)

There were plenty of available moorings and multiple dinghy docks to land the dinghy. The lobsters at the Anegada Reef Hotel (still run by Lorraine) were, as we remembered them, the size of small ponies. Cow Wreck Beach, pristine and isolated, remains one of my favorite beaches in all of the Caribbean.

Randy & Scott at Cow Wreck Beach, Anagada, BVIs (March 2018)

Randy & Scott at Cow Wreck Beach, Anagada, BVIs (March 2018)

Cow Wreck Country Club, Anagada, BVIs (March 2018)

Cow Wreck Country Club, Anagada, BVIs (March 2018)

Cow Wreck Beach, Anagada, BVIs (March 2018)

Cow Wreck Beach, Anagada, BVIs (March 2018)

Scott, Ronan & Ryan, Cow Wreck Beach, Anagada, BVIs (March 2018)

Scott, Ronan & Ryan, Cow Wreck Beach, Anagada, BVIs (March 2018)

During our last visit to Anegada, Randy and the boys took a picture in front of the gag hurricane evacuation sign.

Patton, Randy, Ryan, Ronan, Cow Wreck Beach, BVI

Patton, Randy, Ryan, Ronan, Cow Wreck Beach, BVI

Ironically, hurricane Irma spared this sign and most of Anegada.

Ronan, Randy, Theresa, Ryan & Scott, Cow Wreck Beach, Anagada, BVIs (March 2018)

Ronan, Randy, Theresa, Ryan & Scott, Cow Wreck Beach, Anagada, BVIs (March 2018)

Our next stop, another one of our favorite spots, Jost Van Dyke . . .

LEVERICK BAY & GORDA SOUND, TORTOLA, BRITISH VIRGIN ISLANDS – by Therresa

We picked up a mooring ball at the Leverick Bay Resort where there was evidence of hurricane damage in the form of a few blue tarps on the roofs of some of the structures and several large boats that had been washed firmly ashore. Many mooring balls were missing pendants, so we radioed Leverick Bay Resort, who guided us to a usable mooring. The resort was in the full on party mode with live music and all of the restaurants, bars and souvenir shops open for business.

Leverick Bay, Virgin Gorda, BVIs (March 2018)

Leverick Bay, Virgin Gorda, BVIs (March 2018)

It was almost surreal that this place could be so much business as usual when across the bay (Gorda Sound), the destruction was total and complete. From Leverick Bay, we ventured just around the corner to Gorda Sound where many of our very favorite spots in the BVIs were located. [See British Virgin Islands (2015) Saba Rock had a great restaurant and boutique hotel – totally destroyed. We have been informed there are plans in  place to rebuild.

Saba Rock, Gorda Sound, Virgin Gorda (March 2018)

Saba Rock, Gorda Sound, Virgin Gorda (March 2018)

Directly across the water taxi channel was the Bitter End Yacht Club – reduced to piles of broken lumber and smashed furniture. 

Bitter And Yacht Club, North Sound, Virgin Gorda, BVIs (March 2018)

Bitter And Yacht Club, North Sound, Virgin Gorda, BVIs (March 2018)

Ryan & Ronan surveying the hurricane damage, Gorda Sound, Virgin Gorda, BVIs (March 2018)

Ryan & Ronan surveying the hurricane damage, Gorda Sound, Virgin Gorda, BVIs (March 2018)

Our favorite spot in the world for roti, The Fat Virgin – completely destroyed.

Fat Virgin, North Sound, Virgin Gorda, BVIs (March 2018)

Fat Virgin, North Sound, Virgin Gorda, BVIs (March 2018)

Next to the Fat Virgin was a series of small but very nice homes and cottages where the local workers lived. All of their homes have been totally leveled, their livelihoods destroyed. Many of these people will have to retrain for other work, leave or both.

There was a magnificent Yacht Club designed with docks for mega yachts in Biras Creek. The docks are completely gone and the majestic white building that served as an exclusive restaurant and club house is boarded up, watched over by a couple of security guards.

Gorda Sound, Virgin Gorda, BVIs (March 2018)

Gorda Sound, Virgin Gorda, BVIs (March 2018)

Gorda sound was eerily full of empty mooring ball. In sum, six month’s after Hurricane Irma, Gorda sound is complete void of eany boats or restaurants or resources. Leverick Bay, on the other hand, is a good spot to spend the night on a mooring and dine ashore. It is also a prime local for an early morning launch to our all time favorite spot in the BVIs, Anegada, which we were informed escaped Irma’s wrath. More on Anegada in our following post.